February TBR

February TBR

In February I will continue only reading books from my TBR, for #theunreadshelfproject. There are now eight books on my TBR for the coming month, but (of course) I hope to read more!


Switch It Up by Sarah Brookes

Welcome to Noble House, Where Your Passion is Our Pleasure, and Someone is Always Watching…

Hacker Madeline Zane gets off on crossing lines. So when she discovers security flaws in the Noble House website, she thinks nothing of showing up at the door of the hybrid fetish club and demanding an audience with the owner. Especially after watching an intense online scene of the notorious Dom bringing a submissive to her knees.

Kochran Duke is weary of always being in control, but meeting Maddy rekindles his pleasure in what had become strictly business. And instead of making him jealous, seeing her submit to his old friend Ezra has him aching for something he didn’t even know he was searching for.

The kind of heartbreak Ezra’s lived through changes a man. Maddy makes him crave a life he thought he’d put behind him for good. Watching her with Kochran only fuels his desires, rousing the caged beast within.

Fortunately at Noble House, virtually any fantasy can become reality.
(Goodreads)

I received an ecopy of this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review, which will be up on February 19th! I believe this book will be full of Fifty Shades vibes and I have to admit that I’m highly looking forward to reading it.


The Murder at the Vicarage by Agatha Christie

The murder of Colonel Protheroe — shot through the head — is a shock to everyone in St Mary Mead, though hardly an unpleasant one. Now even the vicar, who had declared that killing the detested Protheroe would be ‘doing the world at large a favour,’ is a suspect — the Colonel has been dispatched in the clergyman’s study, no less. But the picturesque English village of St Mary Mead is overpopulated with suspects. There is of course the faithless Mrs Protheroe; and there is of course her young lover — an artist, to boot.

Perhaps more surprising than the revelation of the murderer is the detective who will crack the case: ‘a white-haired old lady with a gentle, appealing manner.’ Miss Jane Marple has arrived on the scene, and crime literature’s private men’s club of great detectives will never be the same.
(Goodreads)

This will be my first Miss Marple ever! I loved reading about Hercule Poirot, so I’m really curious about Miss Marple’s adventures!


Come to Dust by Bracken McLeod

Ever since her mother abandoned her, five-year-old Sophie has had to depend on her uncle Mitch for everything. But he’s struggling. Restarting a life interrupted by time in prison is hard enough without having to balance work and single parenthood. Mitch is determined to make it work though, striving to keep their family together despite the obstacles in their way, because no matter how difficult things get, they are good for each other. And life for the two of them seems to be looking up. But when Sophie dies tragically, it all comes crashing down. Mitch descends into a crippling grief, coming to understand how little his freedom means without her to share it with. And though released from the sudden responsibility thrust upon him, all he wants is his niece back, safe and alive.

When he gets his wish and scores of children around the world begin to inexplicably rise from the dead—Sophie among them—everything becomes much harder.

Mitch rescues her from the morgue, determined to carve out a normal life for them no matter what, though it soon becomes clear that may not be possible. While the kids who’ve returned behave like living children, they still look very dead. And they can do something else that normal children cannot. Something terrifying. Beliefs differ whether the children’s return is a mercy or a sign of approaching judgment, and a congregation of religious fanatics determined to usher in the apocalypse has their own plan for salvation.

Now Mitch must find a way to save Sophie from an increasingly hostile world that wants to tear them apart and put her back in the ground for good.
(Goodreads)

This book was included in the July box from The Nocturnal Reader’s Box (themed: The Feast). I loved reading Bleed by Ed Kurtz, which was also included in that month’s box, so I think I’ll love this one as well!


Sleeping Beauties by Stephen King

In a future so real and near it might be now, something happens when women go to sleep; they become shrouded in a cocoon-like gauze. If they are awakened, if the gauze wrapping their bodies is disturbed or violated, the women become feral and spectacularly violent; and while they sleep they go to another place. The men of our world are abandoned, left to their increasingly primal devices. One woman, however, the mysterious Evie, is immune to the blessing or curse of the sleeping disease. Is Evie a medical anomaly to be studied, or is she a demon who must be slain?
(Goodreads)

I will be FINALLY reading Sleeping Beauties, which released September last year. I’ve heard mixed opinions on this book, but since it’s a Goodreads Choice winner of 2017, I just have to love it right?!


A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess

Told by the central character, Alex, this brilliant, hilarious, and disturbing novel creates an alarming futuristic vision of violence, high technology, and authoritarianism. Anthony Burgess’ 1963 classic stands alongside Orwell’s 1984 and Huxley’s Brave New World as a classic of twentieth century post-industrial alienation, often shocking us into a thoughtful exploration of the meaning of free will and the conflict between good and evil.
(Goodreads)

I’ll be reading this thin book as part of the Rory Gilmore Reading Challenge and because I want to read more classics in 2018! I’ve heard that this book is really disturbing and violent, so yes, I’m looking forward to reading it geheh!


Vermilion by Molly Tanzer

The Adventures of Lou Merriwether, Psychopomp

Gunslinging, chain smoking, Stetson-wearing Taoist psychopomp, Elouise “Lou” Merriwether might not be a normal 19-year-old, but she’s too busy keeping San Francisco safe from ghosts, shades, and geung si to care much about that. It’s an important job, though most folks consider it downright spooky. Some have even accused Lou of being more comfortable with the dead than the living, and, well… they’re not wrong.

When Lou hears that a bunch of Chinatown boys have gone missing somewhere deep in the Colorado Rockies she decides to saddle up and head into the wilderness to investigate. Lou fears her particular talents make her better suited to help placate their spirits than ensure they get home alive, but it’s the right thing to do, and she’s the only one willing to do it.

On the road to a mysterious sanatorium known as Fountain of Youth, Lou will encounter bears, desperate men, a very undead villain, and even stranger challenges. Lou will need every one of her talents and a whole lot of luck to make it home alive…

From British Fantasy Award nominee Molly Tanzer comes debut novel Vermilion, a spirited weird Western adventure that puts the punk back into steampunk.
(Goodreads)

This book was included in the December box from The Nocturnal Reader’s Box (yes, I want to read all the books included in NRB’s asap!) and I’ve heard lots of good about it!


Letting Go by Maria Thompson Corley

Even though she lives hundreds of miles away, when Langston, who dreams of being a chef, meets Cecile, a Juilliard-trained pianist, he is sure that his history of being a sidekick, instead of a love interest, is finally over. Their connection is real and full of potential for a deeper bond, but the obstacles between them turn out to be greater than distance. Can these busy, complicated people be ready for each other at the same time? Does it even matter? Before they can answer these questions, each must do battle with the ultimate demon – fear.

Told in a witty combination of standard prose, letters, emails, and diary entries, LETTING GO is a long-distance love story that also examines race, religion, and the difficult choices we make following our passions. From the Great White North to the streets of New York City to the beaches of Bermuda, LETTING GO is a journey of longing, betrayal, self-discovery and hope you will never forget.
(Goodreads)

This is another review book that’s been on my TBR for way too long. It really sounds like a nice romance! I kindly received an ecopy of this book in exchange for an honest review.


Hell Hound by Ken Greenhall

‘What are the possibilities of my strength? That is a thought I have never had before. What if some morning as the old woman stood at the head of the staircase she were suddenly to feel a weight thrusting against the back of her legs? What if she were to lunge forward, grasping at the air, striking her thin skull against the edge of a stair? What would become of me if she were found unmoving at the bottom of the stairway?’

Such are the thoughts of Baxter, a sociopathic bull terrier on the hunt for the perfect master, as he contemplates the demise of his first victim. The basis for the acclaimed 1989 film Baxter, Ken Greenhall’s utterly chilling and long-unobtainable Hell Hound (1977) has earned a reputation as a lost classic of horror fiction. This first-ever reissue includes a new introduction by Grady Hendrix.
(Goodreads)

This book was included in the January box from The Nocturnal Reader’s Box and sounds like such a great read!


What book are you looking forward to reading in February?

3 thoughts on “February TBR

    1. Two of these are review copies and three of them are from the Nocturnal Reader’s box haha! So not that “popular” (yet 😏) I’ve heard lots of good about them though! 🙌🏼

      Like

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